Aquaponics Blog Posts

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6 steps to growing zucchini in pots

March 19, 20247 min read

Candy the Aquaponics Lady

6 Steps to Growing Zucchini in Pots

Zucchini are actually one of the easiest things to grow, especially in pots, though like everything, a bit of a helping hand can get you further along.

Seriously, they are the best plant to grow in pots, as they easily grow vertically if you 'train' them. I had the mental image of 'training a dog', what about you?

It is similar, you tie up the zucchini plant, showing it where and how you want it to grow.

First thing, is not all zucchini are created equal, and some will grow better in your pots than others.

how to grow zucchini

The Best Zucchini Varieties to Grow in Containers Are:

Don't forget to know your climate, and know that zucchini is summer vegetable, so winter growing is only possible indoors.

There are 'two main types'.

Large varieties which are great for growing in pots, and bush varieties are better suited for garden beds.

Some types of zucchini:

  • Astea: Astea is a French variety of bush that was specifically developed for growing in pots. Their fruits grow at the base of the plant, making it easier to harvest them in 48 days time.

  • Bush Baby: Bush Baby plants can grow to 45-50cm (18-24 inches) in height and produce small fruit. These dark green vegetables with grey stripes only measure 15cm (6 inches) and mature within 59 days.

  • Golden: This golden fruit has been a favourite in gardens for decades in many countries. A bush variety that tops out at over 1m tall. These golden fruits are harvest-ready approx 50 days after planting and provide plenty of produce throughout the season.

  • Dark Green: The ‘Dark Green’ variety of zucchini produces dark green, 20cm (6- to 8 inch) long fruits with pale flesh. These are heirloom plants, reaching a mature height of 60-70cm (24-36 inches) and is usually ready for harvesting in 45 – 55 days after planting.

  • Grey: The green and white speckled skin zucchini often known as 'Grey' or 'Tender Gray'. This heat-resistant bush variety grows to a mature height of 60cm (24-36 inches). Growing approx 15cm (6 inches) long, these fruits are medium in colour, green on the outside but flecks of grey start coming through at about 4 ounces before turning bulbous. With a long harvest period: 42 – 45 days from seedling to ripe fruit, you are set for the season!

  • Buckingham Patio: These guys grow in just most climates, and produce beautiful yellow fruit that is ready for harvest within 40 days of planting them - of course, yellow has to be your thing!

1. Choosing a Container

container zucchini

The right contain for any plant will depend on how big it will get, and ensuring that there is enough root space. In the case of zucchini, you also need to be able to add stakes for plant stability.

Containers around 45cm deep (18in) should allow for approx 20L (5G) of soil. Added extra, if you have a layer of gravel at the bottom and no holes in the bottom of the pot, fill this area with water and have a drainage hole a little higher up, you can convert a container into a small wicking bed! Though do you research here, it can be a great asset in warm areas.

There are many container options, I'm going to suggest you try to upcycle here, your local tip shops, op shops, even Facebook Marketplace or local groups ~ let's reduce the amount of landfill!

Containers can be anything from plastic, ceramic, terracotta, even polystyrene boxes ~ though these ones only last a season.

2. Soil

Zucchini plants are a type of 'squash' ~` like pumpkin, so they need moist soil to grow. This can be challenging living in warm climates, as fungal issues can also be common.

If you are able to generate your own soil and compost, that's wonderful. If not, research the local potting mix, soil mix and compost mix ~ they are truly not all created equal. A good one will retain water (may even have water crystals in it) and slow release fertiliser.

Here's a 'pro tip' for you: after each season, you need to empty the soil and refill. The nutrients will mostly be used up, and without being 'refreshed', the next seasons crops wont have anything to help them grow.

This will cause nutrient deficiencies like blossom end rot (BER) in zucchini, which is a calcium deficiency.

3. Location

Summer plants that love full sun (though in really hot areas, give them a little shade). They need temperatures between 4-21C (40F-70F) with 6 hours of sunlight per day is for essential best growth.

A sunny spot is best for growing.

4. Planting and watering

To grow zucchini from seed, the soil temperature must be at least 15 C (60 F). Below that temperature for too long and the seed will most likely not germinate.

With this, it is important to get your seeds from a place where they guarantee good germination rates, not just cheap supermarket seed packs. They are cheap for a reason.

To get your plants producing large quantities of fruit, don't wait for the fruit to grow too large. This limits the number of fruit grown, as well as the fruit having a woody texture. Harvest when medium, and grow more!

It is often best to germinate the seeds in seedling trays, the spacing is perfect, and gives your container time to finish growing something else.

When planting out, ensure that there is enough room for the to spread out. Powdery mildew in common on zucchini in humid areas, so ensure good air flow through the leaves, even trimming off the lower leaves.

Water enough to ensure the soil is moist, but not wet.

Growing zucchini in your aquaponics system will ensure good watering and fertiliser!

5. Caring for Your Zucchini

Some people say to start removing the bottom leaves that are dead or damaged when the plant is 60cm tall, however if you live in humid areas, remove damaged leaves early.

Try not to damage any fruit, again if in areas with fruit fly, wrap them in a mesh bag. Humidity has its issues.

They require full sun to grow well, and are considered heavy feeders.

Weekly tonic or fertilising can be beneficial.

If you are able to compost, this is a great option for fertilising, or your worm farm castings. Has great benefits to your zucchini.

zucchini flowers

Mulching can consist of shredded leaves, grass clippings or straw. The best time for this is before planting your crops – 5cm or 2 inches should be enough around seedlings, and add more as the plant grows. This keeps in the moisture.

To ensure the fruits are pollinated, hand pollination is a good way to go. The male and female flowers are easy to tell the difference, as the female flowers have the fruit behind them.

6. Harvesting

When your fruit has ripened, twist it off at the top and use. Zucchini is great when grated and frozen to add into fritters or breads.

You can eat the fruit, the flowers and even the leaves if they are healthy.

The more you harvest, the more energy the plant puts into growing more. If you leave the fruit to get too big, it will reduce the amount of fruit grown.


Want to get your Eyes and Hands on the FREE Online Aquaponics Essentials Course?

This is a great free resource to really understand how aquaponics is a sustainable ecosystem that will grow your organic food is a productive way.

You learn how all the 'parts' make up the 'whole', and helps to give you the foundations of understanding aquaponics.

Sign up HERE


Candy Alexander

Candy Alexander is a dedicated aquaponics enthusiast with a wealth of formal training in aquaculture. Over the past 15 years, Candy has been deeply immersed in both commercial and backyard aquaponics, honing her skills and expertise in this sustainable farming method.

Candy's passion lies in making aquaponics accessible to everyone. With a mission to simplify aquaponics, she believes that anyone can embark on this sustainable journey.

She encourages those new to aquaponics to "kick the tires" without a significant financial investment. Her guidance focuses on helping people start their aquaponics journey with small-scale systems, ensuring a low barrier to entry for newcomers.

Candy shares practical tips, step-by-step guides, and personal stories to inspire and guide readers on their aquaponics adventure. Whether you're a seasoned farmer or a curious beginner, Candy Alexander is your go-to source for simplifying aquaponics and fostering a sustainable gardening experience.

blog author image

Candy Alexander

Candy Alexander is a passionate aquaponics educator who believes in the philosophy of keeping things simple and close to nature. With over 15 years of experience in aquaponics and 4 years of formal training in aquaculture, Candy is determined to help people create sustainable gardening in their urban lifestyle. Additionally, she advocates for the therapeutic benefits of aquaponics, viewing it as a form of garden therapy for mental health. Through her expertise and dedication, Candy strives to make the intricate world of aquaponics accessible to all, fostering both environmental sustainability and personal well-being.

Back to Blog

Gardening Blogs

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6 steps to growing zucchini in pots

March 19, 20247 min read

Candy the Aquaponics Lady

6 Steps to Growing Zucchini in Pots

Zucchini are actually one of the easiest things to grow, especially in pots, though like everything, a bit of a helping hand can get you further along.

Seriously, they are the best plant to grow in pots, as they easily grow vertically if you 'train' them. I had the mental image of 'training a dog', what about you?

It is similar, you tie up the zucchini plant, showing it where and how you want it to grow.

First thing, is not all zucchini are created equal, and some will grow better in your pots than others.

how to grow zucchini

The Best Zucchini Varieties to Grow in Containers Are:

Don't forget to know your climate, and know that zucchini is summer vegetable, so winter growing is only possible indoors.

There are 'two main types'.

Large varieties which are great for growing in pots, and bush varieties are better suited for garden beds.

Some types of zucchini:

  • Astea: Astea is a French variety of bush that was specifically developed for growing in pots. Their fruits grow at the base of the plant, making it easier to harvest them in 48 days time.

  • Bush Baby: Bush Baby plants can grow to 45-50cm (18-24 inches) in height and produce small fruit. These dark green vegetables with grey stripes only measure 15cm (6 inches) and mature within 59 days.

  • Golden: This golden fruit has been a favourite in gardens for decades in many countries. A bush variety that tops out at over 1m tall. These golden fruits are harvest-ready approx 50 days after planting and provide plenty of produce throughout the season.

  • Dark Green: The ‘Dark Green’ variety of zucchini produces dark green, 20cm (6- to 8 inch) long fruits with pale flesh. These are heirloom plants, reaching a mature height of 60-70cm (24-36 inches) and is usually ready for harvesting in 45 – 55 days after planting.

  • Grey: The green and white speckled skin zucchini often known as 'Grey' or 'Tender Gray'. This heat-resistant bush variety grows to a mature height of 60cm (24-36 inches). Growing approx 15cm (6 inches) long, these fruits are medium in colour, green on the outside but flecks of grey start coming through at about 4 ounces before turning bulbous. With a long harvest period: 42 – 45 days from seedling to ripe fruit, you are set for the season!

  • Buckingham Patio: These guys grow in just most climates, and produce beautiful yellow fruit that is ready for harvest within 40 days of planting them - of course, yellow has to be your thing!

1. Choosing a Container

container zucchini

The right contain for any plant will depend on how big it will get, and ensuring that there is enough root space. In the case of zucchini, you also need to be able to add stakes for plant stability.

Containers around 45cm deep (18in) should allow for approx 20L (5G) of soil. Added extra, if you have a layer of gravel at the bottom and no holes in the bottom of the pot, fill this area with water and have a drainage hole a little higher up, you can convert a container into a small wicking bed! Though do you research here, it can be a great asset in warm areas.

There are many container options, I'm going to suggest you try to upcycle here, your local tip shops, op shops, even Facebook Marketplace or local groups ~ let's reduce the amount of landfill!

Containers can be anything from plastic, ceramic, terracotta, even polystyrene boxes ~ though these ones only last a season.

2. Soil

Zucchini plants are a type of 'squash' ~` like pumpkin, so they need moist soil to grow. This can be challenging living in warm climates, as fungal issues can also be common.

If you are able to generate your own soil and compost, that's wonderful. If not, research the local potting mix, soil mix and compost mix ~ they are truly not all created equal. A good one will retain water (may even have water crystals in it) and slow release fertiliser.

Here's a 'pro tip' for you: after each season, you need to empty the soil and refill. The nutrients will mostly be used up, and without being 'refreshed', the next seasons crops wont have anything to help them grow.

This will cause nutrient deficiencies like blossom end rot (BER) in zucchini, which is a calcium deficiency.

3. Location

Summer plants that love full sun (though in really hot areas, give them a little shade). They need temperatures between 4-21C (40F-70F) with 6 hours of sunlight per day is for essential best growth.

A sunny spot is best for growing.

4. Planting and watering

To grow zucchini from seed, the soil temperature must be at least 15 C (60 F). Below that temperature for too long and the seed will most likely not germinate.

With this, it is important to get your seeds from a place where they guarantee good germination rates, not just cheap supermarket seed packs. They are cheap for a reason.

To get your plants producing large quantities of fruit, don't wait for the fruit to grow too large. This limits the number of fruit grown, as well as the fruit having a woody texture. Harvest when medium, and grow more!

It is often best to germinate the seeds in seedling trays, the spacing is perfect, and gives your container time to finish growing something else.

When planting out, ensure that there is enough room for the to spread out. Powdery mildew in common on zucchini in humid areas, so ensure good air flow through the leaves, even trimming off the lower leaves.

Water enough to ensure the soil is moist, but not wet.

Growing zucchini in your aquaponics system will ensure good watering and fertiliser!

5. Caring for Your Zucchini

Some people say to start removing the bottom leaves that are dead or damaged when the plant is 60cm tall, however if you live in humid areas, remove damaged leaves early.

Try not to damage any fruit, again if in areas with fruit fly, wrap them in a mesh bag. Humidity has its issues.

They require full sun to grow well, and are considered heavy feeders.

Weekly tonic or fertilising can be beneficial.

If you are able to compost, this is a great option for fertilising, or your worm farm castings. Has great benefits to your zucchini.

zucchini flowers

Mulching can consist of shredded leaves, grass clippings or straw. The best time for this is before planting your crops – 5cm or 2 inches should be enough around seedlings, and add more as the plant grows. This keeps in the moisture.

To ensure the fruits are pollinated, hand pollination is a good way to go. The male and female flowers are easy to tell the difference, as the female flowers have the fruit behind them.

6. Harvesting

When your fruit has ripened, twist it off at the top and use. Zucchini is great when grated and frozen to add into fritters or breads.

You can eat the fruit, the flowers and even the leaves if they are healthy.

The more you harvest, the more energy the plant puts into growing more. If you leave the fruit to get too big, it will reduce the amount of fruit grown.


Want to get your Eyes and Hands on the FREE Online Aquaponics Essentials Course?

This is a great free resource to really understand how aquaponics is a sustainable ecosystem that will grow your organic food is a productive way.

You learn how all the 'parts' make up the 'whole', and helps to give you the foundations of understanding aquaponics.

Sign up HERE


Candy Alexander

Candy Alexander is a dedicated aquaponics enthusiast with a wealth of formal training in aquaculture. Over the past 15 years, Candy has been deeply immersed in both commercial and backyard aquaponics, honing her skills and expertise in this sustainable farming method.

Candy's passion lies in making aquaponics accessible to everyone. With a mission to simplify aquaponics, she believes that anyone can embark on this sustainable journey.

She encourages those new to aquaponics to "kick the tires" without a significant financial investment. Her guidance focuses on helping people start their aquaponics journey with small-scale systems, ensuring a low barrier to entry for newcomers.

Candy shares practical tips, step-by-step guides, and personal stories to inspire and guide readers on their aquaponics adventure. Whether you're a seasoned farmer or a curious beginner, Candy Alexander is your go-to source for simplifying aquaponics and fostering a sustainable gardening experience.

blog author image

Candy Alexander

Candy Alexander is a passionate aquaponics educator who believes in the philosophy of keeping things simple and close to nature. With over 15 years of experience in aquaponics and 4 years of formal training in aquaculture, Candy is determined to help people create sustainable gardening in their urban lifestyle. Additionally, she advocates for the therapeutic benefits of aquaponics, viewing it as a form of garden therapy for mental health. Through her expertise and dedication, Candy strives to make the intricate world of aquaponics accessible to all, fostering both environmental sustainability and personal well-being.

Back to Blog

Garden Therapy with Aquaponics Blogs Below

blog image

6 steps to growing zucchini in pots

March 19, 20247 min read

Candy the Aquaponics Lady

6 Steps to Growing Zucchini in Pots

Zucchini are actually one of the easiest things to grow, especially in pots, though like everything, a bit of a helping hand can get you further along.

Seriously, they are the best plant to grow in pots, as they easily grow vertically if you 'train' them. I had the mental image of 'training a dog', what about you?

It is similar, you tie up the zucchini plant, showing it where and how you want it to grow.

First thing, is not all zucchini are created equal, and some will grow better in your pots than others.

how to grow zucchini

The Best Zucchini Varieties to Grow in Containers Are:

Don't forget to know your climate, and know that zucchini is summer vegetable, so winter growing is only possible indoors.

There are 'two main types'.

Large varieties which are great for growing in pots, and bush varieties are better suited for garden beds.

Some types of zucchini:

  • Astea: Astea is a French variety of bush that was specifically developed for growing in pots. Their fruits grow at the base of the plant, making it easier to harvest them in 48 days time.

  • Bush Baby: Bush Baby plants can grow to 45-50cm (18-24 inches) in height and produce small fruit. These dark green vegetables with grey stripes only measure 15cm (6 inches) and mature within 59 days.

  • Golden: This golden fruit has been a favourite in gardens for decades in many countries. A bush variety that tops out at over 1m tall. These golden fruits are harvest-ready approx 50 days after planting and provide plenty of produce throughout the season.

  • Dark Green: The ‘Dark Green’ variety of zucchini produces dark green, 20cm (6- to 8 inch) long fruits with pale flesh. These are heirloom plants, reaching a mature height of 60-70cm (24-36 inches) and is usually ready for harvesting in 45 – 55 days after planting.

  • Grey: The green and white speckled skin zucchini often known as 'Grey' or 'Tender Gray'. This heat-resistant bush variety grows to a mature height of 60cm (24-36 inches). Growing approx 15cm (6 inches) long, these fruits are medium in colour, green on the outside but flecks of grey start coming through at about 4 ounces before turning bulbous. With a long harvest period: 42 – 45 days from seedling to ripe fruit, you are set for the season!

  • Buckingham Patio: These guys grow in just most climates, and produce beautiful yellow fruit that is ready for harvest within 40 days of planting them - of course, yellow has to be your thing!

1. Choosing a Container

container zucchini

The right contain for any plant will depend on how big it will get, and ensuring that there is enough root space. In the case of zucchini, you also need to be able to add stakes for plant stability.

Containers around 45cm deep (18in) should allow for approx 20L (5G) of soil. Added extra, if you have a layer of gravel at the bottom and no holes in the bottom of the pot, fill this area with water and have a drainage hole a little higher up, you can convert a container into a small wicking bed! Though do you research here, it can be a great asset in warm areas.

There are many container options, I'm going to suggest you try to upcycle here, your local tip shops, op shops, even Facebook Marketplace or local groups ~ let's reduce the amount of landfill!

Containers can be anything from plastic, ceramic, terracotta, even polystyrene boxes ~ though these ones only last a season.

2. Soil

Zucchini plants are a type of 'squash' ~` like pumpkin, so they need moist soil to grow. This can be challenging living in warm climates, as fungal issues can also be common.

If you are able to generate your own soil and compost, that's wonderful. If not, research the local potting mix, soil mix and compost mix ~ they are truly not all created equal. A good one will retain water (may even have water crystals in it) and slow release fertiliser.

Here's a 'pro tip' for you: after each season, you need to empty the soil and refill. The nutrients will mostly be used up, and without being 'refreshed', the next seasons crops wont have anything to help them grow.

This will cause nutrient deficiencies like blossom end rot (BER) in zucchini, which is a calcium deficiency.

3. Location

Summer plants that love full sun (though in really hot areas, give them a little shade). They need temperatures between 4-21C (40F-70F) with 6 hours of sunlight per day is for essential best growth.

A sunny spot is best for growing.

4. Planting and watering

To grow zucchini from seed, the soil temperature must be at least 15 C (60 F). Below that temperature for too long and the seed will most likely not germinate.

With this, it is important to get your seeds from a place where they guarantee good germination rates, not just cheap supermarket seed packs. They are cheap for a reason.

To get your plants producing large quantities of fruit, don't wait for the fruit to grow too large. This limits the number of fruit grown, as well as the fruit having a woody texture. Harvest when medium, and grow more!

It is often best to germinate the seeds in seedling trays, the spacing is perfect, and gives your container time to finish growing something else.

When planting out, ensure that there is enough room for the to spread out. Powdery mildew in common on zucchini in humid areas, so ensure good air flow through the leaves, even trimming off the lower leaves.

Water enough to ensure the soil is moist, but not wet.

Growing zucchini in your aquaponics system will ensure good watering and fertiliser!

5. Caring for Your Zucchini

Some people say to start removing the bottom leaves that are dead or damaged when the plant is 60cm tall, however if you live in humid areas, remove damaged leaves early.

Try not to damage any fruit, again if in areas with fruit fly, wrap them in a mesh bag. Humidity has its issues.

They require full sun to grow well, and are considered heavy feeders.

Weekly tonic or fertilising can be beneficial.

If you are able to compost, this is a great option for fertilising, or your worm farm castings. Has great benefits to your zucchini.

zucchini flowers

Mulching can consist of shredded leaves, grass clippings or straw. The best time for this is before planting your crops – 5cm or 2 inches should be enough around seedlings, and add more as the plant grows. This keeps in the moisture.

To ensure the fruits are pollinated, hand pollination is a good way to go. The male and female flowers are easy to tell the difference, as the female flowers have the fruit behind them.

6. Harvesting

When your fruit has ripened, twist it off at the top and use. Zucchini is great when grated and frozen to add into fritters or breads.

You can eat the fruit, the flowers and even the leaves if they are healthy.

The more you harvest, the more energy the plant puts into growing more. If you leave the fruit to get too big, it will reduce the amount of fruit grown.


Want to get your Eyes and Hands on the FREE Online Aquaponics Essentials Course?

This is a great free resource to really understand how aquaponics is a sustainable ecosystem that will grow your organic food is a productive way.

You learn how all the 'parts' make up the 'whole', and helps to give you the foundations of understanding aquaponics.

Sign up HERE


Candy Alexander

Candy Alexander is a dedicated aquaponics enthusiast with a wealth of formal training in aquaculture. Over the past 15 years, Candy has been deeply immersed in both commercial and backyard aquaponics, honing her skills and expertise in this sustainable farming method.

Candy's passion lies in making aquaponics accessible to everyone. With a mission to simplify aquaponics, she believes that anyone can embark on this sustainable journey.

She encourages those new to aquaponics to "kick the tires" without a significant financial investment. Her guidance focuses on helping people start their aquaponics journey with small-scale systems, ensuring a low barrier to entry for newcomers.

Candy shares practical tips, step-by-step guides, and personal stories to inspire and guide readers on their aquaponics adventure. Whether you're a seasoned farmer or a curious beginner, Candy Alexander is your go-to source for simplifying aquaponics and fostering a sustainable gardening experience.

blog author image

Candy Alexander

Candy Alexander is a passionate aquaponics educator who believes in the philosophy of keeping things simple and close to nature. With over 15 years of experience in aquaponics and 4 years of formal training in aquaculture, Candy is determined to help people create sustainable gardening in their urban lifestyle. Additionally, she advocates for the therapeutic benefits of aquaponics, viewing it as a form of garden therapy for mental health. Through her expertise and dedication, Candy strives to make the intricate world of aquaponics accessible to all, fostering both environmental sustainability and personal well-being.

Back to Blog

The relaxation you feel when your garden is well known. Aquaponics brings a deeper sense of calm as it connects you with the relaxation of fish as well.

Seeing the miracles of nature happening within your aquaponics system gives you a sense of wonder and excitement.

As everything about aquaponics is based on balance, it gives you the physical representation of balance to connect to when you feel overwhelmed by life.

I use aquaponics as a form of garden therapy to help me manage PTSD,

anxiety, depression, and autism.

Have you been thinking about a deeper meaning in life?

Aquaponics can show you this perfectly!

Check out the article below on how I manage my anxiety with aquaponics:

Managing My "Anxiety Octopus" with Aquaponics


Copyright 2023 | Candy Alexander | All Rights Reserved Email: ask@theaquaponicslady.com